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Tomasz Dziubinski - Photography | all galleries >> MOROCCO 2010 & 2011 >> MOROCCO - ARCHITECTURE, INTERIORS & PLACES > Medina Wall of El Jadida
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Medina Wall of El Jadida
©2011 Tomasz Dziubinski

Medina Wall of El Jadida

El Jadida, Morocco

The design of the Fortress of Mazagan is a response to the development of modern artillery in the Renaissance. The star form of the fortress measures 250m by 300m. The slightly inclined, massive walls are 8m high on average, with a thickness of 10m, enclosing a patrolling peripheral walkway 2m wide. At the present time the fortification has four bastions: the Angel Bastion in the east, St Sebastian in the north, St Antoine in the west, and the Holy Ghost Bastion in the south. The fifth, the Governorís Bastion at the main entrance, is in ruins, having been destroyed by the Portuguese in 1769. Numerous colonial-era Portuguese cannons are still positioned on top of the bastions.

The Portuguese Fortified City of Mazagan was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2004, on the basis of its status as an "outstanding example of the interchange of influences between European and Moroccan cultures" and as an "early example of the realisation of the Renaissance ideals integrated with Portuguese construction technology".

El Jadida (Berber: ⵎⴰⵣⵖⴰⵏ Mazghan, Arabic:الجديدة "new") is a port city on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, in the province of El Jadida. It has a population of 144,440. From the sea, El Jadida's old city; has a very "un-Moorish" appearance; it has massive Portuguese walls of hewn stone. El Jadida, previously known as Mazagan (Portuguese: Mazag„o), was seized in 1502 by the Portuguese, and they controlled this city until 1769, when they abandoned Mazag„o. Its inhabitants were evacuated to Brazil, where they founded new settlement Nova Mazag„o (now in AmapŠ). El Jadida was then taken over by Sultan Mohammed ben Abdallah.

According to UNESCO, the most important buildings from the Portuguese period are the cistern, and the Manueline Church of the Assumption. The design of the Fortress of Mazagan is a response to the development of modern artillery in the Renaissance. The star form of the fortress measures c 250m by 300m. The slightly inclined, massive walls are c 8m high on average, with a thickness of 10m, enclosing a patrolling peripheral walkway 2m wide. At the present time the fortification has four bastions: the Angel Bastion in the east, St Sebastian in the north, St Antoine in the west, and the Holy Ghost Bastion in the south. The fifth, the Governorís Bastion at the main entrance, is in ruins, having been destroyed by the Portuguese in 1769. Numerous colonial-era Portuguese cannons are still positioned on top of the bastions.

Nikon D3 ,Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 2.8/25 ZF
1/1250s f/5.6 at 25.0mm iso200 full exif

other sizes: small medium original
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fotabug13-Jan-2012 06:13
It seems that many of these cities and landmarks you share with us are so clean and fresh. Is this true of them? I think some of our cities could well be influenced by them
lou_rozensteins13-Jan-2012 01:28
Beautiful colours! Just as I imagine this part of the world would be ...!
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