photo sharing and upload picture albums photo forums search pictures popular photos photography help login
Ruth Moorhead | profile | all galleries >> Ruthland (where profile really is) tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Ruthland (where profile really is)

http://www.inei-re.org ..... http://www.glcoherence.org/ ..... http://www.firethegrid.com/.....http://www.fungiphoto.com.....http://www.expectwonderful.com/
Please let me know if you are seeing anything other than a light gray background (except in the Plants gallery).
It distresses me to see my work against a white background. --Thanks!

This is just a bit about me.

Thank you for visiting this celebration of my sublimely right-brained sense of spiritual connection with "the moment," as opposed to people, things, or even places. It really doesn't matter where I am; as soon as I forget time, I begin to see things differently (or maybe it's the other way around...as soon as I begin to "see," I can forget time). While my basic organization is still by places, I have begun to group images into "themes" by borrowing from all the place-based galleries. I am pleased to share my glimpses with you here, and thank you for respecting my copyright by requesting permission to download or use my images.

Over 40 years ago, I began photographing in northern California with a 1940's or '50's Kodak Retina and a Leica IIIb of my father's, then a $5-plus-boxtop Anscomatic p&s, my first camera purchase (which helped me earn my Bachelor of Arts in Art in 1971 at the University of California, Davis). Since that time, photography and sewing have been as close as I have come to "practicing" art.

I have taken the photos here mostly a) from late 2003 to 2013 (when that condemnable phenomenon, planned obsolescence, killed the camera) with an early Canon Digital Rebel, handheld or with a monopod used as a brace against my body and without accessories other than the occasional hat held between the sun and the lens; and b) from 2012 to present with a Fuji Finepix S4000 that can perhaps zoom bigger and record more than the Canon, but is definitely not as nice to hold or use, being lighter and smaller. I took others on slide film at many different times and places with several kinds of cameras (those early first two plus a Leica IIIg, an Olympus OM-4, and a Pentax IQ Zoom, and even a couple of the Kodak 110-formats). A friend (THANK YOU, Richard!) copied some of the slide images in 2003 with a Nikon Coolpix 950, so sometimes that byline will show up.

I have taken a couple of weekend workshops:
. . .my uncle Galen Rowell -- http://mountainlight.com/ in the San Francisco-Oakland region (northern California);
. . .Gary Hayes -- http://www.nwphotoworkshops.com/ on the Olympic Peninsula (southwestern Washington)

and two longer courses
. . .one at American River College in Sacramento in the 1970's;
. . .one in 2007 by Craig Wirth -- http://www.cuzzins.com/ in Pocatello, Idaho

--and would love to take more...somehow life seems to interfere, even in retirement.

I have "Macular Pucker," and higher-than-optimal intra-ocular pressure, if we are to believe one of my medical specialists (the other one just says I have cataracts), which may be why I cannot necessarily tell whether or not a view is in focus. If I've assumed incorrectly, please be forgiving. It was as I saw it, not as you might see it. I'm just showing you where to look.

A viewer explained that she had the sense that these were "real," that she was not looking at perfected, edited, gussied-up work. It is true: I am trying to show it to you as it was at the time I saw it, although I will admit to minor editing on some frames.

Until recently, I rarely went "out to take pictures;" instead, I took the camera with me if I went somewhere, and if an opportunity came along, I jumped into it and went for the ride. Once, in that manner, I spent two hours going through 9 rolls of film on a mountain in the middle of Nevada. With digital now, it is SUCH a pleasure to have the only "limit" be the number of clean data cards and charged batteries I'm carrying (I've learned to "recharge" by warming batteries in my pocket, too!). And now, I lead a monthly outing JUST for photography (well, and eating).

Thanks for dropping by! Please leave notes!


--Ruth Moorhead, Pocatello, Idaho
While I don't sing solos if I can help it, because music done badly isn't really music and can be difficult to enjoy, I feel okay about putting these out for y'all to see because here, I can do photography even a bit badly, and still feel good about it because people seem to enjoy it. That enjoyment is one powerfully valuable essence of art.

It is also a way for me to participate in a world-wide effort to bring peace, harmony, and an end to suffering in our own lives.  It happens this way:  When we can feel in our hearts genuine appreciation and gratitude, we are speaking to the web of creation our expectation for peace and harmony to be returned to us. When we can see our surroundings and our relationships as beautiful and harmonious and feel appreciation and gratitude for that, we are generating the signal that the Universe needs to produce that abundantly around us. 

Here, on this website, vast numbers of us are putting out images that inspire appreciation and gratitude (I know, because I am endlessly awed by the images I see in people's collections, and I write and tell them, Thank you for bringing that home to us.) The more we can participate in that practice, the better our world will be.

A version of this image hung in a photography show in Pocatello, Idaho during April 2013, with the title, Winsome Summer Face.  I had to explain to more than one viewer that it was not precisely the flower whose portrait was being captured; it was the way it was peeking out from behind its comrades' foliage.
Arnica at Pebble Creek

While I don't sing solos if I can help it, because music done badly isn't really music and can be difficult to enjoy,
I feel okay about putting these out for y'all to see because here, I can do photography even a bit badly, and still feel good about it because people seem to enjoy it. That enjoyment is one powerfully valuable essence of art.

It is also a way for me to participate in a world-wide effort to bring peace, harmony, and an end to suffering
in our own lives. It happens this way: When we can feel in our hearts genuine appreciation and gratitude, we are
speaking to the web of creation our expectation for peace and harmony to be returned to us. When we can see our surroundings and our relationships as beautiful and harmonious and feel appreciation and gratitude for that, we are generating the signal that the Universe needs to produce that abundantly around us.

Here, on this website, vast numbers of us are putting out images that inspire appreciation and gratitude (I know, because I am endlessly awed by the images I see in people's collections, and I write and tell them, "Thank you for bringing that home to us.") The more we can participate in that practice, the better our world will be.

A version of this image hung in a photography show in Pocatello, Idaho during April 2013, with the title, "Winsome Summer Face." I had to explain to more than one viewer that it was not precisely the flower whose portrait was being captured; it was the way it was peeking out from behind its comrades' foliage.