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Ali Majdfar | profile | all galleries >> PERSIA, the Ancient Iran >> Bistun (Behistun) tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

PASSARGAD | PERSEPOLIS | NAQSH-e RUSTAM | SHUSHTAR, Ancient Hydro Engineering Exhibition | SUSA ( SHUSH ) | Temple of Khorheh | Taq ( Tagh ) -e- Bostan | DEZFUL | Ganjnameh | CHOQA ZANBIL | Anahita Temple | Ardashir Palace | Takht -e- Soleyman ( The Throne of Solomon ) | Atashkooh Fire Temple | Ancient City of Goor | Ghaleh Dokhtar ( Firooz Abad ) | Niasar Chahar Taghi (Four Arches) | Hegmataneh ( Ecbatana ) | Bistun (Behistun) | Ancient City of Bishapur ( Bishabur ) | Niasar Cave ( Mitra Temple ) | Persian Woman in the Course of History | Ancient Rock Art ( Petroglyphs ) | Bazeh Khur ( Bazeh Hur) Fire Temple | Tang -e- Chogan ( Polo Valley ) | Ancient Sialk Hills | Dash Kasan Temple (Dragon Temple) | TAKHT -E- ROSTAM FIRE TEMPLE | Deyr Gachin Caravansary | Rashkan Fort | Ancient Gavmishan Bridge | Posht Ghale Fortress | Tappeh Mill Fire Temple | Ancient City of Seymareh (Madakto) | Persian Heritage in the USA

Bistun (Behistun)

PERSIA the ANCIENT IRAN



The Behistun Inscription (also Bisitun, Bistun or Bisutun, Modern Persian: ; Old Persian: Bagastana, meaning "the god's place or land") is located in the Kermanshah Province of Iran.

The inscription includes three versions of the same text, written in three different cuneiform script languages: Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian. A British army officer, Henry Rawlinson, had the inscription transcribed in two parts, in 1835 and 1843. The text of the inscription is a statement by "Darius I" the great of Persia, written three times in three different scripts and languages: two languages side by side, Old Persian and Elamite, and Babylonian above them. Some time around 515 BC, he arranged for the inscription of a long tale of his accession in the face of the usurper Smerdis of Persia (and Darius' subsequent successful wars and suppressions of rebellion) to be inscribed into a cliff near the modern town of Bisistun, in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains of Iran.
The inscription is approximately 15 metres high by 25 metres wide, and 100 metres up a limestone cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media (Babylon and Ecbatana). It is extremely inaccessible as the mountainside was removed to make the inscription more visible after its completion. The inscription was illustrated by a life-sized bas-relief of Darius, holding a bow as a sign of kingship, with his left foot on the chest of a figure lying on his back before him. The prostrate figure is reputed to be the pretender Gaumata. Darius is attended to the left by two servants, and ten one-metre figures stand to the right, with hands tied and rope around their necks, representing conquered peoples. Faravahar floats above, giving his blessing to the king. One figure appears to have been added after the others were completed, as was (oddly enough) Darius' beard, which is a separate block of stone attached with iron pins and lead.

The monument suffered some damage from soldiers using it for target practice during World War II. In recent years, Iranian archaeologists have been undertaking conservation works. The site became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Bistun
Bistun
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Hercules
Hercules
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Behistun
Behistun
Farhad Tarash
Farhad Tarash
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription
Bistun Inscription