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Ali Majdfar | profile | all galleries >> PERSIA, the Ancient Iran >> Anahita Temple tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

PASSARGAD | PERSEPOLIS | NAQSH-e RUSTAM | SHUSHTAR, Ancient Hydro Engineering Exhibition | SUSA ( SHUSH ) | Temple of Khorheh | Taq ( Tagh ) -e- Bostan | DEZFUL | Ganjnameh | CHOQA ZANBIL | Anahita Temple | Ardashir Palace | Takht -e- Soleyman ( The Throne of Solomon ) | Atashkooh Fire Temple | Ancient City of Goor | Ghaleh Dokhtar ( Firooz Abad ) | Niasar Chahar Taghi (Four Arches) | Hegmataneh ( Ecbatana ) | Bistun (Behistun) | Ancient City of Bishapur ( Bishabur ) | Niasar Cave ( Mitra Temple ) | Persian Woman in the Course of History | Ancient Rock Art ( Petroglyphs ) | Bazeh Khur ( Bazeh Hur) Fire Temple | Tang -e- Chogan ( Polo Valley ) | Ancient Sialk Hills | Dash Kasan Temple (Dragon Temple) | TAKHT -E- ROSTAM FIRE TEMPLE | Deyr Gachin Caravansary | Rashkan Fort | Ancient Gavmishan Bridge | Posht Ghale Fortress | Tappeh Mill Fire Temple | Ancient City of Seymareh (Madakto) | Persian Heritage in the USA

Anahita Temple

PERSIA the ANCIENT IRAN



( ) Anahita, or Nahid, was a major deity in the Persia. She was the protector of water and the goddess of beauty, fertility and fecundity.
The Anahita Temple is the name of one of two archaeological sites in Iran popularly thought to have been attributed to the ancient deity Anahita. The larger and more widely known of the two is located at Kangvar in Kermanshah Province. The other is located at Bishapur.
The remains at Kangavar reveal an edifice that is Hellenistic in character, and yet display Persian architectural designs. The plinth's enormous dimensions for example, which measure just over 200m on a side, and its megalithic foundations, which echo Achaemenid stone platforms, "constitute Persian elements". This is thought to be corroborated by the "two lateral stairways that ascend the massive stone platform recalling Achaemenid traditions".
In the first half of the first century AD the Greek geographer, Isidore of Charax, was the first to mention the Temple in his book, refering to it as the "Temple of Artemis".
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