photo sharing and upload picture albums photo forums search pictures popular photos photography help login
Type your message and click Add Comment
It is best to login or register first but you may post as a guest.
Enter an optional name and contact email address. Name
Name Email
help private comment
Jeff Cochran | profile | all galleries >> Savannah Pictures >> The Pirates House tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

The Pirates House

You Want To Stay In Savannah At A Bed and Breakfast?

Bed and Breakfast descriptions, photos and reservation information for Savannah,Georgia,USA


Planning your next vacation to Savannah? Find discount tickets to tours and activities - Click Here!

HOME    Guestbook   

The Pirates House, near the corner of East Broad and Bay streets, may be the single most famous structure in Savannah. The wooden structure dates back to the late 18th century, having been a tavern and a gathering place for sailors of many nationalities, many of whose activities would not withstand the light of day. And it is famously mentioned in "Treasure Island," Robert Louis Stevenson's tale of piratical greed and revenge -- Captain Flint, based on an historical character, is supposed to have died there while calling for rum. It is comforting to know that even pirates needed some solace for the approach of the afterlife. Captain Flint and other long-since dead, blood-thirsty pirates allegedly used the Pirate's House as a rendezvous and kidnapped unsuspecting men into piracy through tunnels leading away from the establishment to their ships on the river. But Flint's ghost doesn't want to leave the room at the Pirate's House where he died, probably from stomach cancer.

Since 1753, The Pirate's House has been welcoming visitors to Savannah with a bounty of delicious food and drink and rousing good times. Situated a scant block from the Savannah River, The Pirate's House first opened as an inn for seafarers, and fast became a rendezvous for blood-thirsty pirates and sailors from the Seven Seas. Here seamen drank their grog and discoursed, sailor fashion, on their exotic high seas adventures from Singapore to Bombay and from London to Port Said.

Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online.
Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online.
Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online.
Please donate $1 to keep these photos online. Please donate $1 to keep these photos online.