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Wolves, Orono, Ontario

The gray wolf (Canis lupus), also known as the timber wolf or wolf, is a mammal of the order Carnivora. The gray wolf is the largest wild member of the Canidae family and an ice age survivor originating during the Late Pleistocene around 300,000 years ago. Its shoulder height ranges from 0.6 to 0.9 meters (2636 inches) and its weight varies between 20 (sometimes even lower) and 68 kilograms. DNA sequencing and genetic drift studies indicate that the gray wolf shares a common ancestry with the domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) and might be its ancestor. A number of other gray wolf subspecies have been identified, though the actual number of subspecies is still open to discussion.

It is virtually impossible to describe the typical appearance of the wolf Canis lupus. Wolves of many large arctic islands and Greenland usually appear snow-white from a distance, but closer up often reveal grey, black, or reddish shades. Wolves of northern North America and Eurasia vary in colour. A single pack may contain animals that are black, shades of grey-brown, and white. Wolves in the heavily forested areas of eastern North America are more uniform in colour.

Though once abundant over much of North America and Eurasia, the gray wolf inhabits a very small portion of its former range because of widespread destruction of its habitat, human encroachment of its habitat, and the resulting human-wolf encounters that sparked broad extirpation. Considered as a whole, however, the gray wolf is regarded as being of least concern for extinction according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Today, wolves are protected in some areas, hunted for sport in others, or may be subject to extermination as perceived threats to livestock and pets.

Gray wolves play an important role as apex predators in the ecosystems they typically occupy. Gray wolves are highly adaptable and have thrived in temperate forests, deserts, mountains, tundra, taiga, and grasslands.


Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario
Grey Wolf, Orono, Ontario