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Cohasset and Duxbury Railroad

Stations in Marshfield (from North to South)- 1.- East Marshfield, 2.- Seaview, 3.- Marshfield Center (actually Marshfield Hills which used to be the center), 4.- Marshfield and 5.- Webster Place. The Cohasset to Duxbury Railroad was built through Marshfield in 1871 and was an extension of the Greenbush Line of the Old Colony Railroad. It terminated at the Kingston Station. The line was abandoned in 1939 but was responsible for greatly increasing the number of Summer visitors to South Coastal Marshfield. The so-called "Green Harbor Station" (officially called Webster Place) was located near the present Route 139 just west of the Winslow House. ....." One event which greatly influenced the growth of Green Harbor in the late nineteenth century was when....."The Duxbury and Cohasset Railroad was extended through Marshfield in 1871, and the so-called Webster Place depot was built on the north side of Careswell Street near the Duxbury line. People journeyed down from Boston and Rockland, Whitman and Abington to enjoy the beach at Green Harbor. Summer cottages sprang up along the waterfront and in the village, and rural character of old Green Harbor was changed forever. A new way of life came to Green Harbor and William Green's Salt House Beach". "Marshfield - A Town of Villages 1640-1990" - Cynthia Hagar Krusell and Betty Magoun Bates - Historical Research Associates - 1990 - page 25.......From the Marshfield Mariner - April 2008 Marshfield - Former Marshfield resident Ray Freden shared the following remembrance of trains passing through the Seaview section of Marshfield. "Sometime in the fall or winter of 1938, I heard the train whistle blow just after I was put to bed. I went to the window and lifted the green shade and looked across the field beside the Sea View railroad station. I could see the lights of the passenger train going south. The lights were blinking on and off. Later in life did I realize the lights were not blinking; the trees along the side of the tracks made them appear to blink! The trains did not stop at this station any more, and it was boarded up. The Nicholson family lived in the apartment above the station, and Sherman was my friend, 12 years my elder. Sherman showed me how to put coins on the tracks and have them flattened by the train! This must have happened early 1939; I was 5. My mom gave me two pennies and let me go with ‘Sherm’ to the tracks. He placed a nickel on and I put my pennies down. I never heard or saw the train that flattened my pennies. The next day we went to the place where we put the coins and found nothing! Sherm searched up and down and finally found his nickel and one of my pennies. They were flat! I kept that flat oval-shaped penny for years. The trains were discontinued that year. The tracks were pulled up in 1940 and 41. A huge crane on a flat car would lift a length of track, swing around to a flat car behind it and lower it down. Two men would unhitch it, then scramble down to hitch up another. A small ‘donkey’ locomotive would haul it off, filled. This was quite of an event for a 6-year-old
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1927 Topographical Map of Marshfield (showing railroad route)
1927 Topographical Map of Marshfield (showing railroad route)
Waiting for the Train
Waiting for the Train
Marshfield Hills Station
Marshfield Hills Station
Webster Place Station
Webster Place Station
Damon's Point by Doug Lipman
Damon's Point by Doug Lipman
The Governor Bradford Locomotive
The Governor Bradford Locomotive
Next Stop After Webster Place
Next Stop After Webster Place
marshfielddepot.jpg
marshfielddepot.jpg
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