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Peter Ericsson | profile | all galleries >> Tripreports! >> Central and North Thailand October 2013 tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Central and North Thailand October 2013

Central and Northern Thailand 19th-29th of Oct 2013.

Linda and Stuart had time to visit Thailand late October.
Having never been birding in South East Asia it mattered little that it still might rain in Thailand.

Linda came equipped with a lot of enthusiasm for the birdlife and Stuart was equally enthusiastic, though not a birder per se, to bird along as well as taking in the various cultural opportunities we had, along with enjoying the superb and authentic food served on this tour.

We started out at Paktaley and Lampakbia in the province of Petchaburi. No Spoon-billed Sandpiper had arrived yet from their breeding grounds in Northern Russia but we still managed to see 34 species of shore birds. This included the rare Asian Dowitcher, White-faced Plover, Great Knots, Long-toed Stints, Malaysian Plovers and plenty of Terek Sandpipers.

There were also many Painted Storks around and a lone Spot-billed Pelican on a body of water. A single Chinese Egret showed well at the sand spit where it now is regularly seen.

Kaengkrachan National Park was still closed but we still visited Bansongnok feeding station near the park. Here many little and elusive forest birds showed quite well. Best birds were a pair of Kalij Pheasants, several Siberian Blue Robins, a pair of Large Scimitar Babblers and a Red-legged Crake.

Khao Yai National Park was very very quiet but still provided some excitement for a 1st time visitor to this biologically diverse park. Wreathed Hornbills graced us with fly by views which was a nice addition to the Pied Hornbills we had seen at Banmaka Resort near Kaengkrachan. We also got quite close to a male elephant that didn’t really want us too close.

The bulk of our birding was to be in the mountains of the North.

We continued staying at nice places, eating lots of good food and seeing plenty of good birds.

The bog at the summit of Doi Inthanon is a fantastic place to bird in spite of the many tourists. Birds come very close and make for good photographic opportunities as well.
Chestnut-tailed Minla, Ashy-throated Warbler, Pygmy Wren Babbler, Silver-cheeked Laughingthrush, Fulvous-winged Fulvettas, Mrs Gould and Green-tailed Sunbirds, Yellow-bellied Fantail and Snowy-browed Flycatcher were all seen well.

We had one amazing birding adventure one morning by the 2nd checkpoint. After a wet night there was a lot of dead moth by the neon lights in the morning. Birds kept showing at close range for over 2 hours strait. It was gloomy with rain clouds over our heads but a lot of birds on the move: Grey-cheeked Fulvettas, Grey-throated Babbler, Large Niltava, Small Niltava, Chestnut-backed Sibia, Yellow-cheeked Tit, White-tailed Warblers, Chestnut-crowned Warbler and a Slaty-bellied Tesia next to the road.

After a lengthy drive we settled in at Tha Torn. Next morning up the mountain to Doi Lang. What a great biding place that is! Mountain Bamboo Partridge along the roadside as well as a party of Hume’s Pheasants.

The much sought after Giant Nuthatch showed very well as we encountered 4 different birds.

There were no stake outs this time of year as it still is rainy season but that didn’t stop the birds from showing with some regular birding. A Spot-breasted Parrotbill performed at close range, likewise a Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler. Other good birds: Red-faced Liochicla, Long-tailed Sibias, Great Barbet, White-browed Laughingthrushes, Stripe-breasted Woodpecker, Striated Bulbul, Rufus-winged Buzzard and Chestnut-vented Nuthatch.

Our last birding stop was to be Doi Angkhang. This mountain is simply full of impressions ranging from rugged mountains, hill tribe villages, border crossings, authentic Northern food, the Royal project full of flowers and fruit, to free ranging mules along the roads and trails.
All this along with great birds and a temperate climate is simply wonderful.

Some of the birds seen here were: White-tailed Robin, Brown-breasted Bulbuls, Chestnut-bellied Rock Thrush, Hill Prinia, Chestnut-vented White-eyes, Plumbeous Redstart, Slaty-backed Forktails, White Wagtails and gorgeous Crested Finchbills.

Our last day was spent in Chiang Mai city doing the ‘touristy’ thing!

All in all we didn’t come up with a very long list of birds but that mattered very little to both Linda and Stuart who both walked away with lots of sights and sounds on their journey back to life in New York City.

1. Red Junglefowl – 10
2. Kalij Pheasant – 2
3. Little Grebe -1
4. Painted Stork – 10
5. Asian Opebill – 100
6. Black-crowned Night Heron – 2
7. Striated Heron – 3
8. Chinese Pond Heron – plenty
9. Javan Pond Heron – plenty
10. Eastern Cattle Egret – plenty
11. Grey Heron – a few
12. Eastern Great Egret – many
13. Little Egret – many
14. Pacific Reed Egret – 2
15. Chinese Egret – 1
16. Spot-billed Pelican – 1
17. Little Cormorant – many
18. Indian Cormorant – 5
19. Brahimy Kite – 4
20. Shikra – 1
21. Peregrine Falcon – 2
22. Rufus-winged Buzzard -1
23. Northern Goshawk - 1
24. Red-legged Crake – 2
25. White-breasted Waterhen – 6
26. Black-winged Stilt – plenty
27. Grey-headed Lapwing – 4
28. Red-wattled Lapwing – many
29. Pacific Golden Plover – 10
30. Grey Plover – 10
31. Little Ringed Plover – 5
32. Kentish Plover – 50
33. White-faced Plover – 1
34. Malaysian Plover – 6
35. Lesser Sand Plover – many
36. Greater Sand Plover – 10
37. Pheasant-tailed Jacana – 1
38. Common Snipe – 4
39. Asian Dowitcher – 1
40. Eastern Black-tailed Godwit – 200
41. Bar-tailed Godwit – 10
42. Whimbrel – 20
43. Eurasian Curlew – 200
44. Common Redshank – 20
45. Common Greenshank – 10
46. Wood Sandpiper – 10
47. Terek Sandpiper – 150
48. Common Sandpiper – 10
49. Ruddy Turnstone – 2
50. Great Knot – 200
51. Red Knot – 4
52. Sanderling – 10
53. Red-necked Stint – 50
54. Temminck’s Stint – 2
55. Long-toed Stint – 4
56. Curlew Sandpiper – 10
57. Broad-billed Sandpiper – 100
58. Ruff – 5
59. Oriental Pratincole – 5
60. Brown-headed Gull – 50
61. Heuglin’s Gull – 1
62. Caspian Tern – 4
63. Little Tern – 50
64. Common Tern – 100
65. Whiskered Tern – 100
66. White-winged Tern – 4
67. Rock Pigeon – plenty
68. Red Collared Dove – many
69. Spotted Dove – plenty
70. Zebra Dove – many
71. Barred Cuckoo Dove – 4
72. Mountain Imperial Pigeon – 15
73. Vernal Hangning Parakeet – 2
74. Red-breasted Parakeets – 10
75. Greater Coucal – 4
76. Green-billed Malkoha – 5
77. Asian Koel – 3
78. Banded Bay Cuckoo – heard
79. Collared Owlet – heard
80. Asian Barred Owlet – heard
81. Large-tailed Nightjar – heard
82. Germain’s Swiftlet – many
83. Brown-backed Needletails – 10
84. Asian Palm Swift – a few
85. Fork-tailed Swift – 200
86. Indian Roller – 5
87. White-throated Kingfisher – 10
88. Black-capped Kingfisher – 5
89. Common Kingfisher – 3
90. Collared Kingfisher – 3
91. Blue-bearded Bee-eater – 4
92. Green Bee-eater 30
93. Chestnut-headed Bee-eater – 200
94. Oriental Pied Hornbill – 6
95. Wreathed Hornbill – 2
96. Lineated Barbet – 2
97. Blue-eared Barbet – heard
98. Coppersmith Barbet – 4
99. Gold-throated Barbet – 1
100. Great Barbet – 2
101. Grey-capped Pygmy Woodpecker – 1
102. Stripe-breasted Woodpecker – 1
103. Golden-bellied Gerygone – 2
104. Ashy Woodswallow – many
105. Common Iora – 1
106. Black-winged Cuckooshrike – 3
107. Brown-rumped Minivet – 5
108. Grey-chinned Minivet – 5
109. Short-billed Minivet – 4
110. Scarlet Minivet- 5
111. Brown Shrike – 10
112. Grey-backed Shrike – 1
113. Long-tailed Shrike – 3
114. Black-naped Oriole – 4
115. Black-hooded Oriole – heard
116. Black Drongo – plenty
117. Ashy Drongo -20
118. Bronzed Drongo – 5
119. Lesser Racket-tailed Drongo – 3
120. Greater Racket-tailed Drongo – 2
121. Hair-crested Drongo – 40
122. Pied Fantail – 5
123. Black-naped Monarch – 3
124. Yellow-bellied Fantail – 4
125. Small Niltava – 2
126. Large Niltava – 3
127. Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher – 1 seen, many heard
128. Taiga Flycatcher – 10
129. Chinese Blue Flycatcher - 2
130. Verditer Flycatcher – 6
131. Snowy-browed Flycatcher – 2
132. Dark-sided Flycatcher – 2
133. Asian Brown Flycatcher -2
134. Wire-tailed Swallow – 20
135. Barnswallow – 50
136. Asian Martin – 100
137. Red-rumped Swallow – 4
138. Striated Swallow – 4
139. Green Magpie – 1
140. Rufus Treepied – 2
141. Grey Treepie – 6
142. Eastern Jungle Crow – 20
143. Indochinese Bushlark – 1
144. Oriental Skylark – 3
145. Paddyfield Pipit – 5
146. Olive-backed Pipit - 5
147. Black-headed Bulbul – 2
148. Black-crested Bulbul – 20
149. Stripe-throated Bulbul – 4
150. Streak-eared Bulbul – 10
151. Puff-throated Bulbul – 5
152. Grey-eyed Bulbul – 5
153. Ashy Bulbul – 1
154. Brown-breasted Bulbul – 100
155. Red-whiskered Bulbul – 3
156. Striated Bulbul – 10
157. Mountain Bulbul -2
158. Flavescent Bulbul -10
159. Black Bulbul – 4
160. Grey Wagtail – 5
161. White Wagtail – 20
162. Yellow-browed Warbler – 5, common
163. White-tailed Warbler (Davison’s) – common, 3 seen
164. Ashy-throated Warbler – 5
165. Blyth’s Leaf Warbler – only on summit of DI, 2
166. Greenish Warbler – 2
167. 2 Barred Warbler – 4
168. Sulphur-breasted Warbler - 1
169. Pale-legged Warbler – 1 seen
170. Chestnut-crowned Warbler – 1
171. Grey-crowned Warbler – 1
172. Oriental Reed Warbler – heard
173. Aberrent Bush Warbler – 1
174. Zitting Cisticola – 2
175. Plain Prinia – a few
176. Hill Prinia – 5
177. Common Tailorbird – 2
178. Dark-necked Tailorbird – 2
179. Large Scimitar Babbler – 2
180. White-browed Scimitar Babbler – 2
181. Striped Tit Babbler – 2
182. Puff-throated Babbler – 2
183. Rufus-fronted Babbler – 1
184. Chestnut-tailed Minla – 20
185. Rufus-backed Sibia – 3
186. Black-backed Sibia – 20
187. Spectacled Barwing - 5
188. Spot-breasted Parrotbill – 2
189. Black-eared Shrike Babbler – 2
190. White-browed Shrike Babbler – 2
191. Pygmy Wren Babbler – 1
192. Brown-cheeked Fulvetta – 5
193. Rufus-winged Fulvetta – 50
194. Grey-chinned Fulvetta – 20
195. Lesser Necklaced Laughingthrush – 6
196. Greater Necklaced Laughingthrush – 12
197. Black-throated Laughingthrush – 2
198. Silver-cheeked Laughingthrush – 6
199. Red-faced Liochicla – 3
200. White-browed Laughingthrush – 10
201. Oriental Magpie Robin – 10
202. White-rumped Shama – 4
203. White-tailed Robin – 1
204. Slaty-backed Forktail – 2
205. Siberian Stonechat – 6
206. Pied Bushchat – 4
207. Grey Bushchat – 10
208. Japanese Tit – 1
209. Yellow-cheeked Tit – 6
210. Blue-winged Leafbird – 3
211. Golden-fronted Leafbird – 2
212. Orange-bellied Leafbird – 4
213. Asian Fairy Bluebird – 2
214. Common Myna – plenty
215. White-vented Myna – plenty
216. Asian Pied Starling – plenty
217. Black-collared Starling -4
218. Chestnut-tailed Starling – 1
219. White-shouldered Starling – 60
220. Giant Nuthatch – 4
221. Chestnut-vented Nuthatch – 2
222. Oriental White-eye – 20
223. Chestnut-flanked White-eye – 20
224. Japanese White-eye – 100
225. Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker – 3
226. Orange-bellied Flowerpecker – 10
227. Fire-breasted Flowerpecker – 1
228. Buff-bellied flowerpecker – 2
229. Olive-backed Sunbird – 20
230. Mrs Gould’s Sunbird – 10
231. Green-tailed Sunbird – 8
232. Black-throated Sunbird – 4
233. Little Spiderhunter – heard
234. Streaked Spiderhunter – 4
235. House Sparrow – 2
236. Eurasian Tree Sparrow – plenty
237. Scaly-breasted Munia – common
Plumbeous Redstart, female
Plumbeous Redstart, female
Slaty-backed Forktail
Slaty-backed Forktail
Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler
Rusty-cheeked Scimitar Babbler
Red-faced Liochicla
Red-faced Liochicla
Spectacled Barwing
Spectacled Barwing
Yellow-cheeked Tit
Yellow-cheeked Tit
Small Niltava
Small Niltava
Chestnut-tailed Minla
Chestnut-tailed Minla
Snowy-browed Flycatcher
Snowy-browed Flycatcher
Orange-bellied Flowerpecker
Orange-bellied Flowerpecker
Collared Kingfisher
Collared Kingfisher
Siberian Blue Robin
Siberian Blue Robin