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Jean-Michel Peers | all galleries >> GIVERNY en images et GIVERNY AUTREFOIS >> Giverny in days gone by > The Blue House
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The Blue House

The Blue House

Text by André Buffet and Jean-Michel Peers
Translation by Katherine Bourguignon
Photography and layout by Jean-Michel Peers
Postcards from Terra Foundation for American Art
“Blue House” by Guy Rose, with permission from the owner.
________________________________


Located between the Rue des Chandeliers and the Rue du Chêne, the “Maison Bleue”
or “Blue House”, adjoined the house of Roger Singeot, wheelwright and wine-grower/farmer.
Claude Monet purchased the house in answer to the “needs of his kitchen.”




Claire Joyes tells us that “As large as the garden of the pressoir, the land was ideal for
practicing all the imaginable forcing of nature, to cultivate aromatic herbs and
vegetables from the south which he loved. A live-in gardener watched over the cold
frames and mushrooms…” . Marguerite the cook, did not forget Monet’s healthy appetite
and his satisfaction for prepared delicacies. “A daily back and forth was
established between the pink house and the blue house.”
Jean-Pierre Hoschedé passed away in Giverny in the Blue House on May 27, 1961.





In this postcard, we cannot see the Maison Bleue, but its neighboring house belonging to
Roger Singeot, to the left, and the house of Monsieur Edouard Picard, mason, at the center.
Bordering the chemin du Rouet, on the right, we can see an outbuilding of the villa Besche
and its entrance facing the horse carriage. A little further, we can just notice the roof and
chimney of the “Pergola.” Unseen, to the right behind the photographer is the Villa des Pinsons.

_______________________________


A NEIGHBORHOOD OF PAINTERS

Three American painters lived in two of the houses in this area of the village.





The most original, LA PERGOLA, belonged to Guy Rose and his wife, Ethel, Californians.
Guy Rose painted in Giverny as early as 1890 (signing the register at the Hotel Baudy
in 1890, 1891 and 1894); he returned with his wife in 1899, and they purchased La Pergola
in 1904. They built a studio measuring 80 m2 with skylights facing north-east. They remained
in the house until 1912. Among the paintings by Guy Rose is this magnificent “Blue House”
which was the vegetable garden of Claude Monet. The two artists were friends.





We can see a small path, the Rue du Chêne, leading to the Rue d’en Haut.
The stone post at the entrance almost disappeared when the Chemin du Roy was transformed
at the end of the last century. Buried under earth dug from the road, it was going to be
removed when a fortunate accident led to its being placed farther away. The stone post was
installed not far from its original locatoin, where it was no longer possible to install
it given the new layout of the location. (see Daniel Goupil)





The current look of the area and the estimated location of the stone post in the painting.
The Maison Bleue is hidden by the house in the foreground.




The stone post in its current location on the other side of the Chemin du Roy.




Inscription on the side.


The other painter’s house, next door to the Pergola, was the VILLA BESCHE (the name of its owner).
It was rented to Lilla Cabot Perry, then to Frederick William MacMonnies and his wife during the
summers 1894 to 1896 before they purchased the Prieuré (now known as the Moutier) and settled
there. The “Villa Besche” was destroyed, and we have no documents related to it.

It is place, Monsieur Frazier, English diplomat, built the “Maison Large”
in 1926 to enlarge “La Pergola” which he had purchased.





The “Maison Large” is a beautiful house with a slate roof, where he set up a large playroom
for his two girls; the elder one was named Cécile. He housed his personnel in this house,
and they were in charge of watching over his property during his frequent absences.
His maid was Basque. This new house was sold to a pharmacist, Monsieur Dubois,
an expert at bow and arrow.





other sizes: small original
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