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Deadwood, SD

The Treaty of Laramie of 1868 had guaranteed ownership of the Black Hills to the Lakota people. However, in 1874, Colonel George Armstrong Custer led an expedition into the Hills and announced the discovery of gold on French Creek near present-day Custer, South Dakota. Custer's announcement triggered the Black Hills gold rush and gave rise to the lawless town of Deadwood, which quickly reached a population of around 5,000.

In early 1876, frontiersman Charlie Utter and his brother Steve led a wagon train to Deadwood containing what were deemed to be needed commodities to bolster business, that included gamblers and prostitutes, which proved to be a profitable venture. Demand for women was high, and the business of prostitution proved to be a good market.

As the economy changed from gold rush to steady mining, Deadwood lost its rough and rowdy character and settled down into a prosperous town. In 1876 a smallpox epidemic swept through the camp, with so many falling sick that tents had to be set up to quarantine them. Also in that year, General George Crook pursued the Sioux Indians from the Battle of Little Big Horn on an expedition that ended in Deadwood, and that came to be known as the Horsemeat March.

A fire on September 26, 1879, devastated the town, destroying over 300 buildings and consuming everything belonging to many inhabitants. Without the opportunities of rich untapped veins of ore that characterized the town's early days, many of the newly impoverished left town to try their luck elsewhere.

The entire city of Deadwood is a national historic landmark. Authentic re-creation of turn-of-the-century street lamps light the way through accurately, carefully restored architecture. The famous and infamous have left their marks here.

Deadwood offers live entertainment, music, and opens it's streets and heart to the thousands of bikers attending the annual Sturgis Motorcycles rally.

Deadwood's historic gaming halls date back to the Gold Rush of 1876. The action continues today in over 80 establishments. Ranging from nickel slots to $100 bet limits, classic games to new twists, Deadwood's got a game for everyone!
Restaurants abound, you are sure to find just the right establishment to dine in.
We dined at Jakes, a restaurant that is part of the Midnight Star complex, co-owned by Kevin Costner.
Midnight Star, with etched glass, hand-rubbed wood, and polished brass, reflects the opulence of Deadwood during the turn of the century.
Before sitting down to a fine meal, you can try your hand at the slot machines, Black Jack, or Three Card Poker.
welcome to deadwood
welcome to deadwood
wild bill *
wild bill *
historic site
historic site
capture site
capture site
gold mill
gold mill
gold nugget trading post
gold nugget trading post
smoke shop window
smoke shop window
deadwood souvenirs
deadwood souvenirs
Midnight Star gaming emporium
Midnight Star gaming emporium
gold dust window reflection, deadwood SD
gold dust window reflection, deadwood SD
deadwood window reflection
deadwood window reflection
main street deadwood on a summers day
main street deadwood on a summers day
bullock hotel
bullock hotel
saloon no. 10
saloon no. 10
sights and sounds of deadwood
sights and sounds of deadwood
he's a rhinestone cowboy.....
he's a rhinestone cowboy.....
main street deadwood
main street deadwood
deadwood street
deadwood street
clouds rolling in over deadwood
clouds rolling in over deadwood
gold dust
gold dust
main street espresso
main street espresso
oyster bay sign deadwood
oyster bay sign deadwood
harley davidson sign
harley davidson sign
cowboy in deadwood
cowboy in deadwood
stone street
stone street