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31-MAR-2013

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It has now been over a year since I set this up and I have now checked the tank on 7 separate occasions. To check it I remove the fuel sender and send some colored paper into the tank rubbing all the walls and tank floor I can get to. As of yet every single attempt at finding "condensation" has come up BONE DRY...


Does an empty tank condensate.....?? This one doesn't....


EDIT 6/25/14: Just checked it again last night and it is still bone dry. Not even a hint of moisture. I chose to check it yesterday because humidity levels have been in the 90%+ range and night time temps have been dipping to the high 40's 47F - 49F and day time barn temps reaching 118F!!! That is approximately a 70F swing with 80-90% humidity....


EDIT 5/18/14: About two months ago I set it on some 2" thick stone pavers as some surmised that the tank needs to remain cool as it would if in the belly of a boat at ocean temp. Up here in Maine, when hauled out for the winter, there is no "ocean temp" but I placed it on the slower to change temperature stone pavers anyway.. Results, STILL BONE DRY~~~


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Larry 02-Sep-2014 11:58
Alchemy has it exactly right!
SN 19-Jul-2014 11:59
I disagree that thermal mass is that big of an issue....
All sorts of objects left outside will be covered with dew...large small, massive or not.
I'm no expert on the subjects but been living with dew for 60 years and when it forms, it is pretty much on everything subject to the same temp swings. I'm in the no condensation on the insides of tanks for the most part, however I'm not sure that anyone has done a study on the "3/4 fuel tank and measure the amount of water absorption from the air and/or tank sides.
No real matter...like this article states...empty tanks aren't moisture magnets that the old wives tale tellers would have you believe.
Mike 17-May-2014 13:54
Also... Diesel is VERY hygroscopic. You're bringing in the water with the fuel in many cases. It then precipitates out of the fuel and settles to the bottom of the tank as condensate.
Guest 19-Apr-2014 17:18
I have a fuel polishing business and have pumped a lot of water out of tanks. I don't know where it comes from but there are limited sources. Splashing into the vent, dry rotted fuel cap O-rings and dry rotted sending unit gaskets are all sources on the boat. You can also get it from the source. Always try to visit busy marinas, if there has been a sever storm recently or an excessive high tide their tanks can get infiltrated as well.
Paul West
Guest 12-Apr-2014 16:51
Hi Maine,
One situation often found on boats but not modeled by your setup is to have the tank held at a temperature colder than the air via contact or proximity to the ground or water. I think this will make a big difference in the results.