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Arlington National Cemetery in Black & White

On high ground across the Potomac River from Washington, Arlington National Cemetery overlooks The National Mall and US Capitol. On 200 acres owned by Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna, the US government found a final resting place for thousands of Union Army dead lost in the American Civil War. Arlington House, built by George Washington Parke Custis and Lee's family home, became a cemetery for more reasons than it's commanding location. It was the US Army's intention to render the house uninhabitable should the Lee family ever attempt to return.

Robert E. Lee was among America's elite, wealthy and educated. Lee graduated at the top of his class from the US Military Academy at West Point. In early 1861, Lee opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia, but rejected President Abraham Lincoln's offer to command the Union forces. When Virginia seceded from the Union in April 1861, Lee chose to follow his home state. Lee's first field command for the Confederate States came in June 1862 when he took command of the Confederate forces in the East. He remained in that position until the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse 4 years later.

Pvt. William Henry Christman, 67th Pennsylvania Infantry, was the first military service man interred in Arlington National Cemetery on May 13, 1864. Two Unknown Union Soldiers were interred on May 15, 1864. They were the first of nearly 5,000 unknowns now resting in Arlington National Cemetery.

Neither Robert E. Lee, nor his wife, ever attempted to publicly recover control of Arlington House. The couple never returned to the home George Washington Parke Custis had built and treasured. They were buried at Washington University (later renamed Washington and Lee University) where Lee had served as president.

Since the Civil War Arlington National Cemetery has grown to become the final resting place of 300,000 of America's soldiers, leaders and their loved ones.

This gallery is intended to be viewed as a slide show. Click "slideshow" in the upper right hand corner of your screen. Delay can be adjusted below the photograph once the slide show has begun. I recommend a 5 second delay.
28 3897
28 3897
UNKNOWN  .  UNKNOWN  .  UNKOWN
UNKNOWN . UNKNOWN . UNKOWN
43 5448
43 5448
UNKOWN CIVILIAN
UNKOWN CIVILIAN
UNKOWN
UNKOWN
HIS SON
HIS SON
Three Wars
Three Wars
FEB 16 1943
FEB 16 1943
UNKNOWN
UNKNOWN
39 1267
39 1267
HIS WIFE
HIS WIFE