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Selge in Pisidia

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Selge is disappointing in the sense that apart from an antique theatre there is little to see (I obviously missed the “traces” mentioned below). Maybe with time to spend and a good guide one will see a bit more, but not much. I climbed a hill which I thought might be the acropolis hill, but apart from an obvious ruin in the middle distance I did not spot much more than pieces of what may have been the city walls. The setting is gorgeous, though, and the long and winding road that leads up to the village at the feet of the theatre leads through magnificent mountainous country. Villagers quickly approach with “souvenirs”, I managed to leave without buying or offending. On the way up one passes along the river Eurymedon, and even has to cross a still functioning Roman bridge, the Oluk Köprü.
From the Wikipedia I quote: Selge (in Greek Σελγη) was an important city in Pisidia, on the southern slope of Mount Taurus. The town was believed to be a Greek colony, for Strabo states that it was founded by Spartans, but adds the somewhat unintelligible remark that previously it had been founded by Calchas. The acropolis of Selge bore the name of Kesbedion. The district in which the town was situated was extremely fertile, producing abundance of oil and wine, but the town itself was difficult of access, being surrounded by precipices and beds of torrents flowing towards the Eurymedon and Cestrus (today Aksu), and requiring bridges to make them passable. In consequence of its excellent laws and political constitution, Selge rose to the rank of the most powerful and populous city of Pisidia, and at one time was able to send an army of 20,000 men into the field. Owing to these circumstances, and the valour of its inhabitants, for which they were regarded as worthy kinsmen of the Spartans, the Selgians were never subject to any foreign power, but remained in the enjoyment of their own freedom and independence. When Alexander the Great passed through Pisidia (333 BC), Selge sent an embassy to him and gained his favour and friendship. At that time they were at war with Termessos.
Independently of wine and oil, the country about Selge was rich in timber, and a variety of trees, among which the storax was much valued from its yielding a strong perfume. Selge was also celebrated for an ointment prepared from the iris root. The remains of the city consist mainly of parts of the encircling wall and of the acropolis. A few traces have survived of the gymnasium, the stoa, the stadium and the basilica. There are also the outlines of two temples, but the best conserved monument is the theater, restored in the 3rd century AD.
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