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Istanbul June 2010 9610.jpg
26-JUN-2010

Istanbul June 2010 9610.jpg

A viewer informed me: "From left to right: prophets Sophonias - Mica - Jo'el - Zacharias"

The Enc. Brit. has Zephania, adding " also spelled Sophonias Israelite prophet, said to be the author of one of the shorter Old Testament prophetical books, who proclaimed the approaching divine judgment. The first verse of the Book of Zephaniah makes him a contemporary of Josiah, king of Judah (reigned c. 640–609 BC). The prophet's activity, however, probably occurred during the early part of Josiah's reign, for his criticism of the worship of certain gods in Jerusalem (Baal, Milcom, and the host of the heavens) would have been meaningless after Josiah's reform, which took place about 623/622 BC." .

On Mica is has: "the sixth of 12 Old Testament books that bear the names of the Minor Prophets, grouped together as The Twelve in the Jewish canon. According to the superscription, this Judaean prophet was active during the last half of the 8th century BC. The book is a compilation of materials some of which come from a period considerably later than Micah's time. The threats in chapters 1–3 and 6–7:7 are usually attributed to Micah, but the promises in chapters 4–5 and 7:8–20 are generally dated several centuries later. Some of the promises seem to presuppose the fall of Jerusalem and the subsequent Babylonian Exile (6th century BC), but it is possible that some promises date from before the exile or from Micah himself. The exalted view of Zion in 4:1-4 and the messianic character of 5:2–4 reflect the ideology of the Zion cult in Jerusalem before the exile. Micah's threats are directed against idolaters, those who oppress the little man, priests and prophets who use their profession for financial gain, and leaders who pervert equity and abhor justice. The promises emphasize the importance of Zion, where Yahweh or his royal regent reigns over a kingdom of peace, and of the return from exile for Israel as well as for Judah."

On Jo'el it has: "second of 12 Old Testament books that bear the names of the Minor Prophets. The Jewish canon lumps all together as The Twelve and divides Joel into four chapters; Christian versions combine chapters 2 and 3. The book relates nothing about Joel except his name and that of his father. An analysis of the text further indicates that Joel lived during the period of the Second Temple of Jerusalem (516 BC–AD 70), for his book reflects the liturgy then in use. The book's central theme is a concept borrowed from preexilic prophets that salvation will come to Judah and Jerusalem only when the people turn to Yahweh. Then they will not only receive divine favour, but the land itself will become fertile."

And finally Zacharias: also spelled Zacharias, the 11th of 12 Old Testament books that bear the names of the Minor Prophets, collected in the Jewish canon in one book, The Twelve. Only chapters 1–8 contain the prophecies of Zechariah; chapters 9–14 must be attributed to at least two other, unknown authors. Scholars thus refer to a “second” and “third” Zechariah: Deutero-Zechariah (chapters 9–11) and Trito-Zechariah (chapters 12–14). According to dates mentioned in chapters 1–8, Zechariah was active from 520 to 518 BC. A contemporary of the prophet Haggai in the early years of the Persian period, Zechariah shared Haggai's concern that the Temple of Jerusalem be rebuilt. Unlike Haggai, however, Zechariah thought that the rebuilding of the Temple was the necessary prelude to the eschatological age, the arrival of which was imminent. Accordingly, Zechariah's book, and in particular his eight night visions (1:7–6:8), depict the arrival of the eschatological age (the end of the world) and the organization of life in the eschatological community. Among Zechariah's visions was one that described four apocalyptic horsemen who presaged God's revival of Jerusalem after its desolation during the Babylonian Exile. Other visions announced the rebuilding of the Temple and the world's recognition of Yahweh, Israel's God.

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Guest 15-Mar-2011 17:58
Kaandorp

Text of Joel: Fields, don't be afraid, but be joyful and glad because of all the Lord has done [for you] (Joel 2:21)
Guest 02-Mar-2011 14:07
Kaandorp
From left to right: prophets Sophonias - Mica - Jo'el - Zacharias