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Don Boyd | all galleries >> Memories of Old Hialeah, Old Miami and Old South Florida Photo Galleries - largest non-Facebook collection on the internet >> 1883 to 1919 Miami Area Historical Photos Gallery - click on image to view > Early 1900's - the rapids on the Miami River around now 27th Avenue before they were dynamited in 1908
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Early 1900s - the rapids on the Miami River around now 27th Avenue before they were dynamited in 1908
Early 1900's Courtesy of Paul Hampton Crockett - scribd.com

Early 1900's - the rapids on the Miami River around now 27th Avenue before they were dynamited in 1908

Miami River, Miami, Florida


Early residents of the Miami area would come out to this blissful scene to have picnics and watch the water from the Everglades flowing over the coral rocks into the north branch of the Miami River. It's unbelievable now that the rapids were dynamited to speed up the drainage of the Everglades so the land could be used for development. Thank you to Paul Hampton Crockett for keeping the history of the rapids alive in the link below. Other photos and the story can be seen at:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/31828567/Miami-River-Rapids


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Guest 20-Jun-2014 22:40
I wonder if there is any mention of the Miami Circle at the mouth of the river.
Don Boyd08-May-2014 05:37
I remember in the late 50's/early 60's that Snake Creek canal was being dug near the dividing line between Dade and Broward counties. It was west of NW 67th Avenue/Flamingo Road and we drove a few miles out there to fish. There were rapids like the above where the Everglades were draining into the newly dug canal, and lot of rattlesnakes in the area. We only fished there three or four times and there were other fishermen out there. It was eerie seeing all that water flowing into the sterile ugly canal.

Don
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Nicole 08-May-2014 00:11
I agree, what a shame that they destroyed it.
They should have preserved it.
Guest 28-Sep-2012 03:34
That's a shame it was destroyed and should have preserve it.