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Denis Vincelette | profile | all galleries >> New Mexico- Arizona 2010 >> Tombstone Arizona ... the city of Wyatt Earp tree view | thumbnails | slideshow

Tombstone Arizona ... the city of Wyatt Earp

Wyatt Earp was born on March 19, 1848 in Monmouth, Warren County,
Illinois to Nicholas Porter Earp and Anne Virginia-Ann Cooksey Earp.
Wyatt was one of five sons; Virgil, Morgan, James and Baxter.
In 1865, at the age of seventeen he became a stage coach driver.
In 1870, he married his first wife, Irilla H. Sutherland who died within the year.
There is evidence to suggest that in 1871 he skipped bail on a horse-stealing
charge and for the next few years worked as an itinerant railroad construction hand,
surveyor and buffalo hunter. By 1873 he was supporting himself by mining and gambling.

He became a law enforcement officer in 1874, at the age of twenty-six.
From 1874 to 1875 he served as a Wichita policeman, and from 1876 to 1879
he was Deputy Chief Marshall in Dodge City where he established himself as
a fast and accurate gunman. He is believed to have met John 'Doc' Holliday
in Dodge City sometime in 1877.3 By this time Earp was involved with
Celia Ann 'Mattie' Blaylock who was his common law, if not legal wife.
On December 1, 1879, Wyatt, along with at least two brothers migrated to Tombstone, Arizona.
In Tombstone the Earps supported themselves through mining and gambling.
Over time, Wyatt became a Wells Fargo Express Guard.

Virgil was appointed and then elected Marshall.
Wyatt spent time as both deputy marshall and deputy sheriff.
He also received a federal appointment as a deputy U.S. Marshall.
By 1881, while apparently still married to Mattie,
Wyatt was involved with Josephine Sarah Marcus, a mercantile heir,
and apparently a common law wife to the Cochise County Sheriff, John Behan.

The gunfight at the O.K. Corral, from which much of the Earp legend springs,
occurred in Tombstone on October 26, 1881. What is consistently accepted as fact,
is that the Earps had an on-going feud with the Clantons and McLaury (or McLowery) brothers.
It is also generally accepted that the Clantons and McLaurys were
horse/mule thieves and cattle rustlers and were involved in stage coach robberies.

The gunfight, which occurred in mid-afternoon lasted less than one minute and involved approximately seventeen shots.
At the end of the fight Billy Clanton, Tom and Frank McLaury were dead.




The Main street
The Main street
t1%2f63%2f728763%2f4%2f129136352.R034YoXY.jpg Old TImer
Old TImer
Taxi
Taxi
The Old Saloon
The Old Saloon
Saloon Pleasure !
Saloon Pleasure !
The other side of the street
The other side of the street
Be ready
Be ready
t1%2f63%2f728763%2f4%2f129230739.xtNaLe2r.jpg Imagine : Crossing Arizona in this taxi on unpaved roads
Imagine : Crossing Arizona in this taxi on unpaved roads
If you feel cowboy !
If you feel cowboy !
Stetson
Stetson
Walking in the town
Walking in the town
t1%2f63%2f728763%2f4%2f129308899.zKDi7jWY.jpg