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Harel Boren | all galleries >> International Acknowledgements - APODs and Publications > The Jellyfish and Friends (IC443, IC 444 and CR89, M35, NGC2158, IC2157) - 1300 pixels
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The Jellyfish and Friends (IC443, IC 444 and CR89, M35, NGC2158, IC2157) - 1300 pixels
Jan. 15, 2010 Harel Boren

The Jellyfish and Friends (IC443, IC 444 and CR89, M35, NGC2158, IC2157) - 1300 pixels

East Negev Desert, Israel

Canon XSi, modded, Total RGB 75 min. = 15x5 min, ISO 1600
Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Telephoto Lens, EQ6 mount, guided w/PHD and EQMOD

The Jellyfish Nebula is the red jellyfish looking nebula at the center left part of this image.
On its right, the sparse looking open cluster, named CR89, can be seen. Just above the Jellyfish, the bright emission nebula, IC 444, can be seen very well.
On the bottom right of the image lies the beautiful dense open cluster, M35; while right under it in this image lies the small, redded, open cluster, named NGC2158. Another even smaller open cluster can be seen floating just under these two; its named IC2157).

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IC_443:

IC 443 is an extended source, having an angular diameter of 50 arcmin (by comparison, the full moon is 30 arcmin across). At the estimated distance of 5,000 ly (1,500 parsec) from Earth, it corresponds to a physical size of roughly 70 light years (20 parsec).

The SNR optical and radio morphology is shell-like (e.g. a prototypical shell-like SNR is SN 1006), consisting of two connected sub-shells with different centers and radii. A third larger sub-shell, initially attributed to IC 443, is now recognized as a different and older (100,000 years) SNR, called G189.6+3.3.
Notably, IC 443 X-ray morphology is centrally peaked and a very soft X-ray shell is barely visible. Unlike plerion remnants, e.g. the Crab Nebula, the inner X-ray emission is not dominated by the central pulsar wind nebula. It has indeed a thermal origin. IC 443 shows very similar features to the class of mixed morphology SNRs.
Both optical and X-ray emission are heavily absorbed by a giant molecular cloud in the foreground, crossing the whole remnant body from northwest to southeast.

The remnant's age is still uncertain. There is some agreement that the progenitor supernova happened between 3,000 and 30,000 years ago. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations identified a plerion nebula, close to the remnant southern rim. The point source near the apex of the nebula is a neutron star, relic of a SN explosion. The location in a star forming region and the presence of a neutron star favor a Type II supernova, the ultimate fate of a massive star, as the progenitor explosion.

The SNR IC 443 is located in the Galactic anticenter direction (l=189.1), close to the Galacatic plane (b=+3.0). Many objects lie in the same region of sky: the HII region S249, several young stars members of the GEM OB1 association, and an older SNR (G189.6+3.3).

The remnant is evolving in a rich and complex environment, which strongly affects its morphology. Multi-wavelenght observations show the presence of sharp density gradients and different clouds geometries in the surroundings of IC 443 (it seems that these can be seen nicely in this image). Massive stars are known to be short lived (roughly 30 million years), ending their life when they are still embedded within the progenitor cloud. The more massive stars (O-type) probably clear the circum-stellar environment by powerful stellar winds or photoionizing radiation. Early B-type stars, with a typical mass between 8 and 12 solar masses, are not capable of this, and they likely interact with the primordial molecular cloud when they explode. Thus, it is not surprising that the SNR IC 443, which is thought to be the aftermath of a stellar explosion, evolved in such complex environment. For instance, an appreciable fraction of supernova remnants lies close to dense molecular clouds (~50 out of 265 in the Green catalogue), and most of them (~60%) show clear signs of interaction with the adjacent cloud.

X-ray and the optical images are characterized by a dark lane, crossing IC 443 from northwest to southeast. Emission from quiescent molecular gas has been observed toward the same direction[9], and it is likely due to a giant molecular cloud, located between the remnant and the observer. This is the main source of extinction of the low energy SNR emission.

X-ray and the optical images are characterized by a dark lane, crossing IC 443 from northwest to southeast. Emission from quiescent molecular gas has been observed toward the same direction[9], and it is likely due to a giant molecular cloud, located between the remnant and the observer. This is the main source of extinction of the low energy SNR emission.

In the southeast the blast wave is interacting with a very dense (~10,000 cm-3) and clumpy molecular cloud, such that the emitting shocked gas has a ring-like shape. The blast wave has been strongly decelerated by the cloud and is moving with an estimated velocity of roughly 30-40 km s. OH (1720 MHz) maser emission, which is a robust tracer of interaction between SNRs and dense molecular clouds, has been detected in this region. Interestingly, a source of gamma-ray radiation is spatially coincident with IC 443 and the maser emission region, though is not well understood whether it is physically associated with the remnant or not.

In the northeast, where the brightest optical filaments are located, the SNR is interacting with a very different environment. The forward shock has encountered with a wall of neutral hydrogen (HI), and is propagating into a less dense medium (~10-1,000 cm-3) with a much higher velocity (80-100 km s-1) than in the southern ridge.

In the western region, the shock wave breakouts into a more homogeneous and rarefied medium






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